How do you make slime with 2 ingredients?


How do you make slime with 2 ingredients

How do you make slime with 2 ingredients?

Today I’m going to be testing out some two ingredient slime recipes How do you make slime with 2 ingredients

How to make slime without glue or borax


Okay so the first two ingredients slime we’re trying is the pearl slime.

How To Make Pearl Slime

How do you make slime with 2 ingredients

What you will need:

1-Clear Glue

2-Shaving Gel

So i’m just going to go ahead and start off by taking some clear glue and emptying that into a large glass bowl and then to this which is completely optional it’s not included as an ingredient i’m going to add into drops of blue food coloring mix that all together.


Then it’s time to go ahead and activate our slime our activator today is going to be shaving gel not shaving foam not shaving cream shaving gel That is what’s going to activate it.

How do you make slime with 2 ingredients


This only works for clear glue by the way for some reason it has a reaction that it turns it into some slime so you just use it like a regular activator just add it in a little bit at a time stir after each time then when you’re done going with your hands start kneading it.

For some reason it takes a lot of shaving gel to actually activate the slime ,but it’s totally worth that you get a very shiny and fluffy slime.

How do you make slime with 2 ingredients


This is what it looks like when you make it without any food coloring.

How do you make slime with 2 ingredients


The second two ingredients slime that i’m going to be testing out is the infamous wood glue slime.

How To Make Yellow Wood Glue Slime

How do you make slime with 2 ingredients

What you will need:

1-Wood Glue

2-Shaving Foam

For this i’m going to go ahead and take some wood glue and empty that into a large glass bowl i use the whole entire bottle.

How do you make slime with 2 ingredients


and then i’m going to go ahead and make it a little bit brighter by adding some yellow food coloring because yellow is my favorite color if you haven’t noticed already.

How do you make slime with 2 ingredients


Now it is time to activate. To activate this time we’re going to be using some shaving foam not shaving gel not shaving cream shaving foam this is going to act like our activator.

Here i will say you will need to add a lot of it but just do it the exact same way as a normal activator added in a little bit at a time stirring after each time that you use it in.

How do you make slime with 2 ingredients


And yes it was pretty much but once it starts coming together you can go in with your hands and start kneading in.

It’s going to be very messy like i said because you need a lot of shaving cream for this but it’s totally worth it it’s like a butter slime and a fluffy slime combined.

How do you make slime with 2 ingredients


For some reason this is very sticky when you first make it but if you let it sit out for about five or ten minutes then it will be perfect to play with.


And the third in the final slime that i’m going to be testing is the shampoo and salt slime so we’re going to ,see if this works.


I just added in some two in one shampoo by suave that it is the only type of shampoo that i have heard that works and an activator for that is going to be our salt so you just add a little bit of salt in at a time.

How To Make Shampoo and Salt Slime

How do you make slime with 2 ingredients

How to make slime without glue or borax

What you will need:

1-Shampoo

2-Salt


I just did this using a salt shaker and then i just went ahead and mixed it all together and i could see that it was starting to form into slime.

How do you make slime with 2 ingredients

I added in more stirring after every time that i did it.
This is what happened i mean it definitely turned into slime i will give it that but it melts in your hand it’s so weird like you can’t touch this slime.

How do you make slime with 2 ingredients


How to make slime without borax

 Slime is a popular toy that kids (and adults!) love to make and play with. It’s just so satisfying to squish and stretch.

The problem is, many slime recipes call for borax, a laundry additive. While we’ve never encountered any issues with borax, some people have reported burns from this type of slime. Others are concerned about how safe this ingredient is for a children’s toy. It may also irritate sensitive skin.

So, the answer is borax-free recipes.

The problem is, most “borax-free” recipes on the internet actually still use borax. After extensive research, I found that most borax-free recipes include liquid starch or liquid laundry detergent. After a quick scan of some labels and some manufacturers’ websites, I realized that many starches and detergents contain borax, often listed as its scientific name sodium tetraborate decahydrate.

So, after testing alternative methods, I’ve found three truly borax-free recipes. The first two recipes create what is called “fluffy” slime, or slime that has an airiness to it and is almost dough-like. The last is a more traditional slime that has a lot of stretch to it.

Basic fluffy slime recipe

This is a simple recipe that can be customized to make various forms of fluffy slime. Add more water for a wetter, stretchier slime, bits of polystyrene beads to make popping slime or glitter for unicorn slime, for example.

To make the slime, you’ll need shampoo of any type — though the thicker, the better — and cornstarch. Here’s how to make it:

  1. Put 1/2 cup shampoo and 1/4 cup of cornstarch in a bowl.
  2. Mix well.
  3. Add 3 drops of food coloring (optional).
  4. Add 1 tablespoon of water and stir. Slowly add 5 more tablespoons of water, stirring well after each one.
  5. Knead the slime for around 5 minutes.

If you find that your slime is still sticky after kneading it for a while, keep adding cornstarch to the slime and knead it in until you get a good consistency. 

The recipe worked great when I tried it a couple times with just 1/4 cup cornstarch, but a co-worker found that he needed 2 1/4 cups to get the dough-like consistency of a good fluffy slime. I think the brand of cornstarch and humidity may have a lot to do with the variance in cornstarch amounts from what I’ve observed in my experiments. As long as you end up with a semi-hard, semi-stretchy, moist, light, almost dough-like slime, you did the recipe right. The next recipe has a similar consistency.

Fluffy volcano slime recipe

This slime is called volcano slime because it reacts to heat. After you make it, you can put it in the microwave for 20 seconds to make it melt into a lava-like substance. As it cools, it will turn back into fluffy slime.

You’ll just need white school glue and cornstarch for fluffy volcano slime. Here’s how to make it:

  1. Pour 1/4 cup white school glue and a 1/2 cup of cornstarch in a bowl.
  2. Add 3 drops of food coloring (optional).
  3. Mix it well.
  4. Knead it with your hands for 10 minutes.
  5. Heat it in the microwave for 20 seconds.
  6. Let it cool, then knead it for another 10 minutes.

Stretchy sand slime

This recipe gets you just about as close to borax-quality slime as possible. It is stretchy and gooey. It will have a grainy texture, though, like sand.

You’ll need white school glue, baking soda and contact lens solution. Then, just follow these directions:

  1. Pour 1 cup glue into a bowl.
  2. Add 1 tablespoon of baking soda.
  3. Add three drops of food coloring (optional).
  4. Mix well.
  5. Add 1 tablespoon of contact lens solution.
  6. Mix well.
  7. Continue to add a tablespoon of contact lens solution and mixing until you get a nice consistency.  

Playing with the dough will firm it up more, so if it seems a little soggy, just knead it for a few minutes. 

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